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sloppy:

Sean Yeh
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(Source: manzardcafe, via elephentshoe)

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ffffffound:

I need a guide: kim joon
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judocalamar:

Ron Ulicny: 
“Feeding Time” By TOM CHAMBERS….

judocalamar:

Ron Ulicny

Feeding Time” By TOM CHAMBERS….

Photoset

nevver:

Looking down, David Maisel

Quote
"I hate slick and pretty things. I prefer mistakes and accidents, which is why I like things like cuts and bruises—they’re like little flowers. I’ve always said that if you have a name for something, like ‘cut’ or ‘bruise,’ people will automatically be disturbed by it. But when you see the same thing in nature, and you don’t know what it is, it can be very beautiful."

— David Lynch  (via myarmisnotalilactree)

(Source: variationsonrelations, via quo-diapsalmata-deactivated2014)

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(Source: art-yeti, via deadchildstar)

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dapperandspiffing:

(Photo by me)

dapperandspiffing:

(Photo by me)

Text

dadoodoflow:

Wonder Woman isn’t
Coming because Superman
Doesn’t understand Amazonian
Anatomy though I
Didn’t know that
When I was
A kid in
Underoos with a
A bath towel
Tied around my
Neck leaping chair
To sofa to
Avoid lava that
Can burn even
A Kryptonian. It’s
A joke my
Uncle Erik would
Tell a five
Year old when
No adults were
Around before someone
Ran him over
And worked him
Over with a
Baseball bat until
He saw something
A lot like
Jesus coming to
Earth in a
Tiny rocket ship.

Photoset
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(Source: softwaring, via deadchildstar)

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loverofbeauty:

Jasper Johns: Device (1962)

loverofbeauty:

Jasper Johns: Device (1962)

(via dadoodoflow)

Text

her (what?)

Just saw her (in English with German subtitles) and experienced a wide range of emotions. I then had an interesting conversation with one of my co-workers and some of his friends. The co-worker had problems with the film because he felt fremdscham (a sense of shame for others, cf. “schadenfreude”) throughout. He also couldn’t let go of the idea that Samantha was a machine. I wonder if the sense of joy we feel when the device in our pocket buzzes after we’ve waited for an answer to a text or an email—or even and perhaps especially the disappointment we feel when that buzzing was just an automated message from a credit card company—is a relationship with a machine. That someone made the device buzz is still true, but it was the buzzing that caused the emotional reaction. I walked home through the medieval streets of this town, typing something on the device I usually keep in my pocket, something that would eventually make someone else’s device buzz, and I looked up at the 400-year-old, half-timbered houses and listened to the gurgle of the canal, and was struck again by the seemingly huge disconnect that, in actuality, isn’t. In the film, Samantha helps Theodore get a physical book of the letters he’s written for other people published. Same as it ever was. Same as it ever was.

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nevver:

Fujicolor