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ffffffound:

Mikhail Gubin’s visionary collage sculptures
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feru-leru:

Blind Fold by Richard Vergez on Flickr.
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malformalady:

Frozen grave plot
Photo credit: Eva Ekebald

malformalady:

Frozen grave plot

Photo credit: Eva Ekebald

(via lindsaybottos)

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(Source: cornellajoan)

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weiyulive:

Li Yuan-Chia, Cosmic Point (catalogue), London: Lisson Gallery, 1967: 3-6.

(via quo-diapsalmata-deactivated2014)

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Reading Der Mensch Erscheint im Holozän, Section 1

pp. 9-24

Today is Sunday.

And the earth was without form, and void; and darkness was upon the face of the deep.1

Someone nodded hello to me on the street yesterday.

To me, or to him?

Someone nodded hello to Reader on the street yesterday.

Church bells were already ringing, to announce the Armistice in November 1918, when word reached Wilifred Owen’s family that he had been killed in battle one week before.

Picasso made Gertrude Stein sit more than eighty times for her portrait.
And then painted out the head and redid it three months later without having seen her again.

Pablo Casals began each day for more than seventy years by playing Bach.

I have come to this place because I had no life back there at all.

I have, Reader has?

Reader has come to this place because he had no life back there at all.2

-Es bleibt nichts als Lesen.

0, 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34, 55, 89, 144, 233, 377, 610, 987, 1597, 2584, 4181, 6765, 10946, 17711, 28657, 46368, 75025, 121393, 196418, 317811, 514229, 832040, 1346269, 2178309, 3524578, 5702887, 9227465, 14930352, 24157817, 39088169 …3

1. Genesis 1:2 (KJV)
2. Markson, David. Reader’s Block. Normal, Illinois: Dalkey Archive, 2001. 9. Print.
3. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fibonacci_number

Reading Der Mensch Erscheint im Holozän, Section 1 was originally published on rocket to nowhere

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Reading Der Mensch Erscheint im Holozän by Max Frish

Toward the end of March, a friend and I decided to read Max Frisch’s book Der Mensch Erscheint im Holozän (Man in the Holocene) together. We also decided to respond to it in writing. To that end, we devised a few rules:

1. The book is 134 pages long. It begins on page 9 and ends on page 143.

(If we read 20 pages a day, it will take us 6.5 days to read the book. If we read 15 pages a day, it will take us 9 days to read the book. If we read 10 pages a day, it will take us 13 days to read the book. (We voted for 15 pages a day.))

2. 15 pages a day would make the following:

(Section 1: pp. 9-24; Section 2: pp. 25-39; Section 3: pp. 40-54; Section 4: pp. 55-67; Section 5: pp. 68-84; Section 6: pp. 85-99; Section 7: pp. 100-114; Section 8: pp. 115-129; Section 9: pp. 130-143)

3. Then we added: Section 9a: response to http://www.theparisreview.org/interviews/2367/the-art-of-fiction-no-113-max-frisch

4. We will read one section per day (skip days may be requested).
5. We will each write one response per section.
6. Responses may not be longer than 268 words.
7. We are not allowed to write within one another’s responses.
8. However, we may comment on each other’s responses.
9. And we may footnote our own responses.
9a. Said footnotes will not count toward any length restriction.

Over the next few weeks, perhaps at a rate of one every three days, I will be posting my responses to Der Mensch Erscheint im Holozän. Those responses will be posted in the category reading: Man in the Holocene.

Reading Der Mensch Erscheint im Holozän by Max Frish was originally published on rocket to nowhere

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sloppy:

Sean Yeh
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(Source: manzardcafe, via elephentshoe)

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ffffffound:

I need a guide: kim joon
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judocalamar:

Ron Ulicny: 
“Feeding Time” By TOM CHAMBERS….

judocalamar:

Ron Ulicny

Feeding Time” By TOM CHAMBERS….

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nevver:

Looking down, David Maisel

Quote
"I hate slick and pretty things. I prefer mistakes and accidents, which is why I like things like cuts and bruises—they’re like little flowers. I’ve always said that if you have a name for something, like ‘cut’ or ‘bruise,’ people will automatically be disturbed by it. But when you see the same thing in nature, and you don’t know what it is, it can be very beautiful."

— David Lynch  (via myarmisnotalilactree)

(Source: variationsonrelations, via quo-diapsalmata-deactivated2014)